Category Archives: FDAzilla

When Will the FDA Move On from Data Integrity?

The FDA has been writing up companies on data integrity since the year 2000. Even after all the horror stories, and even after billions of dollars of market cap have been erased from it, here we are in 2017, still talking about it.

Here is some troubling text from recent Warning Letters that cite data integrity:

“…our investigator observed your warehouse supervisor tearing out pages from your firm’s annual report and placing the pages into his pocket.”

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2016 MHRA GMP Inspections yields 50% more deficiencies in key areas

MHRA Identified GMP Inspection Deficiencies,  2016

by Barbara Unger, GMP Quality Expert and GMP Regulatory Intelligence Editor-in-Chief

The MHRA published a large slide deck that addressed GMP deficiencies identified during inspections in 2016.  They published a slide deck of similar information for 2015 a few months ago.  In this blog, we look at some of the similarities and differences between the two years. The data only represent deficiencies noted for dosage forms and do not include those identified at inspections of API manufacturers.  We previously compared the FDA inspection observations for 2016 with the 2015 MHRA Deficiencies.  

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Warning Letters 2016 – Data Governance & Data Integrity

by Barbara Unger, GMP Quality Expert and GMP Regulatory Intelligence Editor-in-Chief

In 2015 we published a collection of FDA GMP warning letters that included deficiencies in data governance and data integrity.  Here we provide the same information for 2016 drug GMP warning letters. These should serve as a resource for GMP audit staff and QA staff as they evaluate their own firms and contract sites for gaps in these areas.  In this introduction, we provide tables and graphs identifying the dates of the warning letters, firms to which they were issued, and the country where the facility is located.  We also provide a table that shows the trends over time for location of countries where facilities receiving these warning letters were located, beginning in 2008.  And, finally, we provide a tabulation of the regulations most frequently cited for these deficiencies in 2015 and 2016.

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FDA Sent These 8 Warning Letters for Pharma Companies | March 2017

We took a snapshot of the 8 warning letters the FDA sent to pharmaceutical companies last month.  Drug manufacturing violations ranged from failing to monitor the water purification system to personnel not wearing appropriate clothing to prevent contamination.

From pharmaceuticals in California, Singapore, and more, here they are:
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Delay, Denial, or Limiting of Inspections Since 2008

Delay, Denial, or Limiting of Inspections Since 2008

by Barbara Unger, GMP Quality Expert and GMP Regulatory Intelligence Editor-in-Chief

In October 2014, the FDA published a final Guidance for Industry, Circumstances that Constitute Delaying, Denying, Limiting, or Refusing a Drug Inspection. Publishing this guidance was a requirement of section 707 of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA).  Section 707 of FDASIA adds 501(j) to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act) to deem a drug adulterated if it “has been manufactured, processed, packed, or held in any factory, warehouse, or establishment and the owner, operator, or agent of such factory, warehouse, or establishment delays, denies, or limits an inspection, or refuses to permit entry or inspection.”  Before that time and since, the FDA cited instances where firms have delayed inspections or denied investigators access to areas or documents that they should be able to view.

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Assessing Your Readiness State for FSMA: Stabilize, Then Benchmark

Assessing Your Readiness State for FSMA: Stabilize, Then Benchmark

I find that the FSMA readiness of major food brands and CPGs runs the gamut from “scrambling” to “got it covered” — and everywhere in between. Smaller companies have been given more time to prepare by the FDA. Larger companies have considerably less runway to get ready.

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